Archive for May, 2011

Love for Clockroot short stories from the Short Review

Sunday, May 29th, 2011

I was happy to learn about The Short Review in (for a publisher) the best way, by reading their warm reviews of two Clockroot books. On The Life and Memoirs of Doctor Pi:

These often hysterically funny short fictions – occasionally teetering on the brink of becoming prose poetry and presented in a delightful, slightly odd-sized book -  are, shockingly, the first time this major Argentinian poet, playwright, essayist and director has been translated into English, by Emily Toder. As with Georges-Olivier Chateaureynaud’s A Life On Paper, this makes me furious. Why has it taken so long? But enough of fury, let us move on to enjoyment with a tinge of philosophical enquiry, which is really what Dr. Pi himself is after.

I highly recommend picking up a copy of this book, which entertains but does more than that. These stories are both ordered and chaotic, dream-like and yet truthful. Through humour, sheer oddness and philosophical musings, Bayley conveys back to us something of our world, in which nothing ends neatly, no-one can really save the day, and when it comes down to it, everything should be put on hold in order to spend time with a “young brunette with bare, powerful legs, shorts, and a striped T-shirt” on a tandem bike.

Read in full here.

And on Blue Has No South: “a collection that tests out our notions of story, stretches them, and leaves us wanting to dip back into the collection again and again”—read the full review here. There’s also a wonderful interview with Alex Epstein:

TSR: Did you have a collection in mind when you were writing [these stories]? 

AE: At the beginning no, I just wanted to see if I could find a different form for my art, much more focused and dense. To tell a story with few words as possible, a story that sometimes catches just one emotional movement between two people, and sometimes tries to grasp the whole world. After a while I started to think about the “absence of words” as of a material, and was able to aim for a collection of such micro fiction. There is still something deep that draws me toward this.