Archive for the ‘events’ Category

Benjamin Hollander to read in San Francisco, Berkeley, and New York

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Layout 1Come see Benjamin Hollander, author of the just-out In the House Un-American, read on one or both coasts!

On May 15th Hollander will read with George Albon at Bird and Beckett Books in San Francisco.

On May 22nd Hollander and Susan Gevirtz will read at Moe’s Books in Berkeley.

On May 28th St. Marks Bookshop in New York will host Hollander and the poet David Shapiro.

Hope to see you there!

Adania Shibli at the PEN World Voices Festival

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

We’re excited to share that Adania Shibli will join Randa Jarrar and Najwan Darwish for “All That’s Left to You: Palestinian Writers in Conversation,” as part of the PEN World Voices Festival:

Saturday, May 04, 2013, 3:00pm

For the first time in the Festival’s history, PEN brings together a panel of leading Palestinian writers to take their place in the global literary community. From Palestine and from the diaspora, they will share their work, experiences, and visions, revealing how a literature is both imagined and created under occupation, siege, and exile.

Moderated by Judith Butler

Co-sponsored by ArteEast, The Lannan Foundation, The New School, and the Open Society Foundation.

Alex Epstein at the KGB Bar!

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

lunarsavingstimeforwebFor all you New Yorkers or near-enough-to-New Yorkers, we’re thrilled to say that our own Alex Epstein, author of Blue Has No South and Lunar Savings Time, will be reading, with Christine Sneed, at the KGB Bar on March 3, as part of their Sunday Night Fiction series.

Plato in New York

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

Vicki James Yiannias has written a wonderful piece in Greek News on Ersi Sotiropoulos and her “Plato in New York” and her recent doings.

“… [A]n unusual, riveting, and groundbreaking presentation in the Living Room at the Gershwin Hotel on October 11 was described by Sotiropoulos as a “hybrid of a novel that uses fictional narrative, dialogue, and visual poetry”.  “Plato in New York” was perhaps a “first” such hybrid by a Greek author.  But it was not the only “first” from this acclaimed Greek author.  Zigzag through the Bitter Orange Trees, one of her twelve books of fiction, was the first novel ever to receive Greece’s two most important literary awards, the Greek State Prize for Literature and Greece’s preeminent Book Critics Award (2000).  More professional tributes to Sotiropoulos’ work: her last novel, “Eva”, a young woman’s odyssey through the backstreets of Athens on Christmas Eve, won the Athens Academy prize for best novel in 2011, and her book of stories “Feel blue, dress in red” has just been short-listed for Greece’s National Book Award.

Sotiropoulos, who lives in Athens and was Artist in Residence at the Gershwin Hotel from September 6- October 18 (and Director’s Guest there in 2010), explained to the GN that “Plato in New York” used fictional narrative, dialogue and visual poetry, was a way of exploring the identity of the city through analogies between two distinct and very different times and cultures, New York now and Plato’s Athens.  “The idea is to portray New York as Plato’s cave, a complex place where it is almost impossible to separate the real from the virtual”, she says, “Plato wrote, ‘How can you prove whether at this moment we are sleeping, and all our thoughts are a dream; or whether we are awake, and talking to one another in the waking state?’  It seems like the eruption of the past in the present, but it is not so simple.  With the virtual devouring big chunks of the real, apparent these days in the financial world and the media, Plato’s questions seem as relevant as ever.” Read more

Also, for a Greek perspective on the current European economic crisis, see these excerpts of Ersi’s piece for the BBC.

 

Adania Shibli in NYC next week

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Adania Shibli, author of Touch and the newly released We Are All Equally Far from Love, will be at two events in New York next week, hosted by ArteEast.

On April 24, at the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University, at 7 pm, Shibli will participate in the “Gazan Writers’ Salon—Fractured Web: Gazan Writing Online”:

ArteEast presents Fractured Web: Gazan Writing Online, a public program at Columbia University’s Center for Palestine Studies, in which Palestinian writers will discuss how their work has been shaped and affected by the internet. In this discussion Somaya al Sousi and Fatena al Ghorra contextualize their work within the broader landscape of Palestinian literature online, while Adania Shibli (co-editor, Narrating Gaza) explores the way in which such platforms foster literary community and discourse.

The discussion will be moderated by Khalid Hadeed (Cornell University) and featuring academic discussant Helga Tawil Souri (NYU).

On April 25, at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, Shibli will be part of a salon discussing “From Memoir to Reportage and Back Again”

ArteEast will present From Memoir to Reportage and Back Again: Gazan Writers Salon, to present contemporary writing from Gaza to New York’s literary audiences. Through readings of both poetry and prose, the writers will offer a rare glimpse into the diverse emerging and established voices that make up the dynamic literary scene in this city.

In his ode to Gaza, Mahmoud Darwish links Gazan literary production with its unique history within Palestine as a land that has been repeatedly occupied by external forces and subjected to over two decades of sanctions, blockade and strikes: “We are unfair to her when we search for her poems. Let us not disfigure the beauty of Gaza. The most beautiful thing in her is that she is free of poetry at a time when the rest of us tried to gain victory with poems…”

Like Darwish’s poem “Silence for Gaza,” we see Palestinian writers of subsequent generations grapple with the personal and communal experiences of Gaza’s history of occupation, blockade and war.

Participants include Fatena al Ghorra, author of five books of poetry including The Sea is Still Behind Us (Gaza, 2002) and A Very Disturbing Woman (Egypt, 2003), Ellay (multiple editions), Betrayals of god…Multi Scenarios (multiple editions); Adania Shibli, co-editor of the online forum Narrating Gaza, will read from multi-genre writings from Narrating Gaza of other writers that explore the repercussions of the Gaza War; Soumaya Al Sousi has produced four poetry collections, including The First Sip of the Sea’s Chest (1998), Doors (2003), Lonely Alone (2005), and Idea, Void, White in a joint collection with the poet Hala El Sharouf (published by Dar Al-Adab, Beirut, 2005).

These should be two outstanding events—if you’re in in NYC, please do come by.

Montreal greets Alex Epstein

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Alex Epstein will participate in Montreal’s Blue Metropolis Festival, May 1 in Montreal. In anticipation, the Montreal Gazette has published a wonderful review of Lunar Savings Time:

To say that fiction like Epstein’s requires a new way of reading, and it does, is not to say that it’s difficult or unwelcoming. The work leads you along, gradually recalibrating your accustomed response time. The brevity has the effect of concentrating the attention: you grow more alert, eased into the ultra-receptive mindset engendered by a good haiku or zen koan. Before you know it, the longer stories – those of a full page and more – come to feel almost like novels. You become hyper-aware of how much can be fit into a small space – and by extension, how much of conventional fiction is, by strictest definition, unnecessary.

It can’t be said of many writers that they’d be equally at home among contemporary McSweeney’s-style pranksters and the august lineage of Kafka, Borges and Bruno Schulz, but Alex Epstein is just such a find.

Read in full here.

Come find us in DC

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

Clockroot is ramping up for the AWP conference next week at the Marriott Wardman Park — Omni Shoreham Hotels in DC. Come find us at the bookfair at table H5 with panels, translators, and books! And please join us for these Clockroot-strong events:

Clockroot’s own Pam Thompson will be moderating the panel “The Experimental and the International” on Friday, February 4 at 10:30 in the Nathan Hale room of the Marriott.  This panel will feature Karen Emmerich, Scott Esposito, Steve Dolph, Anna Moschovakis, and Jill Schoolman, and will consider  why literature in translation is often described as experimental, touching on such questions as: What issues arise as foreign literary traditions enter the U.S. milieu? What can happen when highly language-focused (thus experimental?) work moves between languages?

Afterwards, back at our booth, Karen Emmerich will be signing books from 1:30–2pm.

Later that evening, Kenyon Review Online, Monsters of Poetry and Rescue Press sponsor readings by Clockroot’s Becka Mara McKay, along with Julia Story, Christie Ann Reynolds, Zach Savich, Shane McCrae, Jess Lacher, Hannah Sanghee Park, Daniel Khalastchi, Kevin Gonzalez, and Adam Fell. 7:30 at the Asylum Bar, 2471 18th Street.

On Saturday at 1:30, back at our booth, Becka will be signing books.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Student Translators in Berkeley

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

For those of you in the Bay Area, there’s an exciting translation-related event coming up: On October 10th, you can check out the Poetry Inside Out program as part of Berkeley’s Watershed Poetry Festival. This exciting program allows grade-school students the opportunity to study and translate renowned foreign-language texts, learn about poetic line, and compose their own work. Students will be reading translation-inspired poetry from A Pocketful of Voices / Un Bolsillo de Voces alongside U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Hass, among others. More info here.

Lydia Davis & Madame Bovary

Sunday, September 19th, 2010

playboybovary

Is there anything more exciting than the promise of Lydia Davis blogging about literary translation?

Besides the woman herself reading from her new Madame Bovary at the 92nd Street Y?

Besides Davis “Getting to Know Your Body”? (This is the phrase that lures readers from the Paris Review Daily to FSG’s Work in Progress blog.)

I for one can’t wait to find out how she translates bouffées d’affadissement. (Truly, despite the breezy, bloggy tone: blame the top hat, the bow tie.)

gusts of revulsion
a kind of rancid staleness
stale gusts of dreariness
waves of nausea
fumes of nausea
flavorless, sickening gusts
stagnant dreariness
whiffs of sickliness
waves of nauseous disgust

Thanks to Scott Esposito for pointing out the Paris Review blog; to FSG for publishing Davis; and to Davis for everything else.

PS: Check out Macy Halford’s post at the New Yorker’s blog on buying this issue of Playboy.

But why weren’t we in Brooklyn?

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Up at the Mantle (thanks to Three Percent for the link), notes on the “Reading the World” international literature panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival this past weekend, which included Karen Emmerich (representing Archipelago), as well as folks from Ugly Duckling, Zephyr, and New Directions.  Looks just fantastic—I’ll include the bit on Karen here as a lead-in, with a note to say I’m lucky enough to have read the Vakalo translation she mentions, and indeed it’s wonderful:

Great stuff all around, an excellently curated panel. Every single one of the works presented is worth purchasing (skip the library and give these people some money!). … Karen Emmerich (representing Team Archipelago) read the poetry and prose from the Greek writer Miltos Sachtouris, skipping us across Aegean waters from Greek isles to ancient Greece. And then… Ms. Emmerich read an outstanding piece of poetry on the life of plant, by the poet/author Helenē Vakalo. The Mantle audience pleads for an answer—what is this poem and where can we find it? This vegetative poetic genius!?!?

[Keep reading here—]

Karen also read at Words Without Borders’ “Down and Dirty Round the World” event on Saturday, an evening of “of hard-boiled, pulpy, and erotic international literature” read by a great lineup of translators.  Karen reports she read from our soon-to-be-released The Sleepwalker—which has been one of those books that as you finish sending it to press you think, how did we get so lucky, that this strange and singular creature just came when we called?  Come to think of it, I think The Sleepwalker encompasses,  all of the above—the hard-boiled, the pulpy, the erotic—in one formidable, terrifying, beautiful hybrid.

All of which is to say—what a feast of a weekend!  Even if we weren’t there, how nice to catch something of the energy of it all even up here in this corner of Massachusetts…